Middle Eastern Pickled Turnips

Pickled Turnips are the pickle of the Middle East, vinegary, a bit of heat and completely addicting and they are the perfect complement to your favorite gyro, falafel, roast chicken or kebab.

Pickled Turnips are the pickle of the Middle East, vinegary, a bit of heat and completely addicting and they are the perfect complement to your favorite gyro, falafel, roast chicken or kebab.

Pickled Turnips are the most beautiful, overlooked, delicious pickle you’ll ever encounter. You probably have never heard of them unless you’ve had Middle Eastern food and at first glance you might be wondering why on earth they are SO pink. Rest assured, no food coloring was used in the production of these pickles.

Pickled Turnips get their gorgeous hue from hanging out with a handful of sliced beets for a week. They’re incredibly easy to make and they add the perfect vinegary, slightly spicy (from the garlic) bite for your favorite Middle Eastern meals. And, if I can just add, the perfect accompaniment to these delicious Pickled Turnips?

Some small hot chili peppers and the most awesome Armenian Zankou’s Garlic Paste with pita bread. A tip on the pita bread? If you can and you have one available, go to your nearest Middle Eastern grocery store to get authentic pita bread. I promise it is 100% different than the ones put out by sliced bread makers. My favorite brand is Toufayan, they’re old school awesome and Armenian.

Oh, hey there Mr. Falafel, looks like you’re got a colorful pickled friend there!

 

Pickled Turnips are the pickle of the Middle East, vinegary, a bit of heat and completely addicting and they are the perfect complement to your favorite gyro, falafel, roast chicken or kebab.

Pickled Turnips really make the PERFECT accompaniment to your Falafel sandwich.

Pickled Turnips are the pickle of the Middle East, vinegary, a bit of heat and completely addicting and they are the perfect complement to your favorite gyro, falafel, roast chicken or kebab.

If you’re wondering about the hummus and the falafel, yes those recipes are coming very soon. But I had to start with my favorite of the bunch. These Pickled Turnips. Some quick tips:

  • Don’t eat the garlic. Trust me, it’s been hanging in vinegar for five days and it will be STRONG.
  • You can totally eat the pickled beets, but the texture will be different than the turnips, less crunchy, more chewy.
  • You can let them sit for longer than five days if you want, but however long ahead you prepare them, refrigerate them before serving. They taste so much better cold!
  • Don’t, I repeat DON’T use table salt. It will taste awful. Stick to Kosher salt.

Pickled Turnips are the pickle of the Middle East, vinegary, a bit of heat and completely addicting and they are the perfect complement to your favorite gyro, falafel, roast chicken or kebab.

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Middle Eastern Pickled Turnips

Pickled Turnips are the pickle of the Middle East, vinegary, a bit of heat. They're the perfect side to your favorite gyro, falafel, roast chicken or kebab.
Yield 16 servings
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Course Side Dish
Cuisine Armenian
Author Sabrina Snyder

Ingredients
 

  • 3 cups water
  • 1/3 cup Kosher salt
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • 2 pounds turnips , peeled and cut into ½ inch thick batons
  • 1 small beet , cut into ½ inch thick batons
  • 2 cloves garlic , roughly chopped

Instructions

  • In a medium sized pot, add the water, Kosher salt and bay leaves.
  • Heat on medium heat, stirring until salt is completely dissolved, 3-5 minutes.
  • Let cool completely then add the vinegar.
  • In a large container with a tight fitting lid, add your turnips and beets.
  • Add the garlic (this can be a very rough chop, you don't eat the garlic, it is only for seasoning so it doesn't need to look pretty).
  • Pour the liquid into the container.
  • Let sit for 5 days.
  • Before serving, they are best refrigerated.
  • The pickles are usually good for about a month (they normally last about a week in our house because I eat them with everything!).

Nutrition

Calories: 21kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Sodium: 2402mg | Potassium: 124mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin C: 12.3mg | Calcium: 22mg | Iron: 0.2mg
Keyword: Armenian food, easy recipes, Middle Eastern food, Middle Eastern Pickled Turnips, Middle Eastern Recipes, pickled turnips, pickling, side dish, side dish recipes, turnips

Pickled Turnips are the pickle of the Middle East, vinegary, a bit of heat and completely addicting and they are the perfect complement to your favorite gyro, falafel, roast chicken or kebab.

Pickled Turnips are the pickle of the Middle East, vinegary, a bit of heat and completely addicting and they are the perfect complement to your favorite gyro, falafel, roast chicken or kebab.
Pickled Turnips are the pickle of the Middle East, vinegary, a bit of heat and completely addicting and they are the perfect complement to your favorite gyro, falafel, roast chicken or kebab.

About the Author: Sabrina Snyder

Sabrina is a professionally trained Private Chef of over 10 years with ServSafe Manager certification in food safety. She creates all the recipes here on Dinner, then Dessert, fueled in no small part by her love for bacon.

Sabrina Snyder is a professionally trained personal and private chef of over 10 years who is the creator and developer of all the recipes on Dinner, then Dessert.

She is also the author of the upcoming cookbook: Dinner, then Dessert – Satisfying Meals Using Only 3, 5 or 7 Ingredients which is being published by Harper Collins.

She started Dinner, then Dessert as a business in her office as a lunch service for her coworkers who admired her lunches before going to culinary school and becoming a full time personal chef and private chef.

As a personal chef Sabrina would cook for families one day a week and cook their entire week of dinners. All grocery shopping, cooking and cleaning was done along with instructions on reheating. As a private chef she cooked for private parties and cooked in family homes in the evenings for families on a nightly basis after working as a personal chef during the day.

Sabrina has been certified as a ServSafe Manager since 2007 and was a longstanding member of the USPCA Personal Chef Association including being on the board of the Washington DC Chapter of Chefs in the US Personal Chef Association when they won Chapter of the year.

As a member of the community of food website creators Sabrina Snyder has spoken at many conferences regarding her experiences as a food writer including the Indulge Food Conference, Everything Food Conference, Haven Food Conference and IACP Annual Food Professionals Conference.

Sabrina lives with her family in sunny California.

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Comments

  1. What type of kosher salt do you use in your recipes, please? My understanding is that one common brand, Morton’s, is much saltier than the other common brand, Diamond. And do adjustments might be needed.

      1. Thanks much for answering, but I know any brand will work. What I was hoping is that you could tell me which brand you use so I could know whether I need to adjust, and in which direction, for the brand I use.

  2. Hi Sabrina, I recently made these but I used 10% acetic acid white vinegar instead of 5%. Do you think they will still be ok to consume? I did try some and they tasted great, but I did not realize at the time there were different strengths of vinegar and that 10% could be potentially harmful? Thanks in advance

    1. I would sit on the cautious side, I do not have experience with poison control information so I don’t feel comfortable giving a suggestion for this, sorry!

      1. Hi sabrina. i only use 10 percent vinegar. it is a food grade vinegar. it has the bite that vinegar used to have. i use it on everything..

  3. So it sits on the counter for 5 days or in the fridge? If on the counter do you then put in the fridge? Would it be bad to just put it in the fridge right away?

  4. I have made this using table salt before seeing the don’t use table salt. Is it going to be awful? Shall I throw or wait and see?
    Was coming to ask if it works with swede as well as turnip or only turnip do you knew?

    1. It will likely be salty, when did you set it aside to pickle? I may just replace the liquid if it weren’t that long ago and use 2/3 the salt. I’m not sure what swede is?

  5. So excited to make this tomorrow! but question is it a dry bay leaf? or fresh? I’m ordering the groceries now and both options came up. Thank you!

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